Charles Allan Stuart (1908–1926)

Charles Allan Stuart

A farm boy from Ontario, Charles Allan Stuart went on to become a very popular figure in Alberta’s legislative history. Born in Cardoc, Middlesex County, Ontario, on August 3, 1864, Stuart graduated from the University of Toronto in 1891, a recipient of the gold medal in Classics. Stuart studied law at Osgoode Hall in Toronto and graduated with an LLB in 1894; he was admitted to the Bar in Ontario in 1896. He established his own law practice in Ontario just prior to falling ill. Hoping that all he needed was a change of climate, much rest, and an ocean breeze to cure him, Stuart went to Mexico where he recuperated.

By February 1897, Stuart had moved to Calgary. He began his lengthy foray into politics in March 1900 when he ran for the Northwest Territories Assembly for West Calgary. He was defeated by future Prime Minister Richard Bennett. In December 1904, he became a member of Calgary's City Council. Stuart finally saw his political aspirations realized under the administration of Premier Alexander Cameron Rutherford when he won a seat representing the electoral district of Gleichen in the Assembly.

His years of public service, during which he “exercised an important influence”, were rewarded on October 8, 1906, with an appointment as Judge of the Supreme Court of Alberta. When a separate Supreme Court was created for the province of Alberta by the Provincial Act of September 1907, Justice Stuart was appointed as a Supreme Court Judge.

Stuart served as the first Chancellor of the University of Alberta Senate from 1908 to 1926 and received an honorary Doctor of Laws from the University in 1915. His family included his wife Beatrice Roxburgh, of Northwood, Ontario, and sons Alan Roxburgh and Charles Eric. Charles Allan Stuart passed away in Calgary on March 5, 1926.

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